My Optometrist recommended anti-fatigue lenses. Are they necessary?

Anti-fatigue lenses are particularly helpful for close-up work. If you, like so many today, rely on your distance-only single-vision lenses, to see your screen clearly, anti-fatigue lenses may be the ideal solution for you.

Throughout the workday, the muscles of your eyes are under constant contraction helping your eyes to focus clearly up close. Things like your smartphone, tablet, textbook, or computer monitors. Anything you use or do up close, for any length of time can cause these muscle contractions which in turn cause eye strain. Burning, itchy, tired eyes are just a few symptoms. Headaches and blurred vision may also result.

Anti-fatigue lenses are primarily used by people who require a distance correction but are not ready for or in need of progressive, multifocal lenses. Typically, if you are under 40, then these lenses offer a great solution to overcoming the visual fatigue associated with near-vision tasks. Like your current eyewear, you can wear glasses with anti-fatigue lenses all day. The upper portion of the lens allows for clear distance vision while the lower portion will increase the amount of time you can work up close. avoiding the symptoms of visual fatigue.

While Anti-fatigue lenses may cost a little more, they are well worth it if you are experiencing the symptoms of eye strain and visual fatigue. They ease the tired eyes and blurred vision so often experienced while reading, writing, crafting, and the myriad other tasks you perform that require your eyes to focus up close.

Stop in or call today and ask the expert opticians at Goodrich Optical about the options available to help you see clearly.

dry_macular_degeneration.jpg?strip=all&lossy=1&ssl=1

New insight on how people with retinal degenerative disease can maintain their night vision for a relatively long period of time has been published today in the open-access eLife journal.

The study suggests that second-order neurons in the retina, which relay visual signals to the retinal ganglion cells that project into the brain, maintain their activity in response to photoreceptor degeneration to resist visual decline — a process known as homeostatic plasticity. Rod photoreceptors are the cells responsible for the most sensitive aspects of our vision, allowing us to see at night, but can be lost during retinal degenerative disease.

The new findings pave the way for further research to understand how our eyes and other sensory systems respond and adapt to potentially compromising changes throughout life.

“Neuronal plasticity of the inner retina has previously been seen to occur in response to photoreceptor degeneration, but this process has been mostly considered maladaptive rather than homeostatic in nature,” explains co-first author Henri Leinonen, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Irvine, US. “Our study was conducted at a relatively early stage of disease progression, while most previous studies focused on severe disease stages, which may account for the discrepancy. Very recently, several studies using triggered photoreceptor loss models have shown adaptive responses in bipolar cells — cells that connect the outer and inner retina. But whether such adaptation occurs during progressive photoreceptor degenerative disease, and whether it helps to maintain visual behavior, was unknown.”

To address this question, Leinonen and colleagues studied a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. This is the name given to a group of related genetic disorders caused by the P23H mutation in rhodopsin, a protein that enables us to see in low-light conditions. Retinitis pigmentosa causes the breakdown and loss of rod-shaped photoreceptor cells in the retina, leading to difficulties seeing at night.

The team combined whole-retinal RNA-sequencing, electrophysiology and behavioral experiments in both healthy mice and those with retinitis pigmentosa as the disease progressed. Their experiments showed that the degeneration of rod photoreceptors triggers genomic changes that involve robust compensatory molecular changes in the retina and increases in electrical signalling between rod photoreceptors and rod bipolar cells. These changes were associated with well-maintained behavioural night vision despite the loss of over half of the rod photoreceptor cells in mice with retinitis pigmentosa.

“This mechanism may explain why patients with inherited retinal diseases can maintain their normal vision until the disease reaches a relatively advanced state,” says co-first author Nguyen Pham, Graduate Research Assistant at the John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, US. “It could also inspire novel treatment strategies for diseases that lead to blindness.”

“Our results suggest retinal adaptation as the driver of persistent visual function during photoreceptor degenerative disease,” concludes senior author Frans Vinberg, PhD, Assistant Professor at the John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah Health. “Additional research is now needed to discover the exact homeostatic plasticity mechanisms that promote cellular signalling and visual function. This could help inform the development of potential new interventions to enhance homeostatic plasticity when needed.”


corneal-transplant.jpg?strip=all&lossy=1&ssl=1

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]A new approach in ophthalmology that offers a revolutionary alternative to corneal transplantation has just been developed by researchers and clinicians in North America, Europe, and Oceania.

The team was co-led by May Griffith, a researcher at Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre, which is affiliated with Université de Montréal and is part of the CIUSSS de l’Est-de-l’Île-de-Montréal.

The results of this multinational project have just been published in the journal Science Advances.

“Our work has led to an effective and accessible solution called LiQD Cornea to treat corneal perforations without the need for transplantation,” said Griffith. She is also a full professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at Université de Montréal.

“This is good news for the many patients who are unable to undergo this operation due to a severe worldwide shortage of donor corneas,” she said.

“Until now, patients on the waiting list have had their perforated corneas sealed with a medical-grade super glue, but this is only a short-term solution because it is often poorly tolerated in the eye, making transplantation necessary.”

A synthetic, biocompatible, and adhesive liquid hydrogel, LiQD Cornea, is applied as a liquid, but quickly adheres and gels within the corneal tissue. The LiQD Cornea promotes tissue regeneration, thus treating corneal perforations without the need for transplantation.

Griffith praised the work of her trainees, Christopher McTiernan and Fiona Simpson, and her collaborators from around the world who have helped create a potentially revolutionary treatment to help people with vision loss avoid going blind.

“Vision is the sense that allows us to appreciate how the world around us looks,” said Griffith. “Allowing patients to retain this precious asset is what motivates our actions as researchers every day of the week.”

For Sylvain Lemieux, president and CEO of the CIUSSS de l’Est-de-l’Île-de-Montréal, “this innovative treatment in ophthalmology confirms the level of expertise of the Centre universitaire d’ophtalmologie de l’Université de Montréal (CUO) at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital (HMR).

“The HMR has one of the largest teams of ophthalmologists in Quebec and one of the best-equipped ophthalmology research laboratories in North America,” he said. “The hard work of our scientists and clinicians contributes daily to best practices and knowledge development.

“The multiple therapeutic possibilities resulting from our fundamental research, particularly in regenerative medicine, benefit and give hope to people suffering from ophthalmological diseases not only in Quebec, but in the rest of the world,” he concluded.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]


F2.large_.jpg?strip=all&lossy=1&ssl=1

Cases of herpes zoster ophthalmicus tripled in 12-year time span, highest among older adults

Source:

Michigan Medicine – University of Michigan

 

More Americans are being diagnosed with eye complications of shingles, but older adults can call the shots on whether they are protected from the painful rash that can cost them their eyesight.

Among a group of 21 million adults, occurrences of herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO), when shingles gets in the eyes, tripled during a 12-year-period, according to Kellogg Eye Center research presented at the 2019 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting in Vancouver.

Study author Nakul Shekhawat, M.D., MPH, says it’s important to figure out which patients are at greatest risk for HZO and how to prevent it “because of the severity of the disease and potential sight-threatening complications.”

Even though caused by the same virus, shingles is different than chickenpox.

Years after recovering from chickenpox, the virus can become active again, causing shingles, a painful, debilitating infection that can lead to corneal scarring and blindness.

Kellogg researchers found that incidence of herpes zoster ophthalmicus across the United States rose substantially between 2004 and 2016, occurring in 9.4 cases per 100,000 people at the beginning of the study period and growing 3 fold to 30.1 cases per 100,000 by the end of the study period.

Shingles affecting the eye may be more of a problem for women and adults over age 75 (53 cases per 100,000), two groups with the highest rates of infection, the study showed.

While shingles has been cropping up in young adults, it is still considered one of the perils of old age.

“Older patients were at far greater risk for HZO, highlighting just how important it is for older adults to get the shingles vaccination,” says Shekhawat, a comprehensive ophthalmologist at the University of Michigan Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences.

Whites, more so than other racial groups, were diagnosed with HZO, with rates lower among blacks (23.4), Asians (21.0) and Latinos (14.6). Among whites, the rate was 30.6 cases per 100,000.

That female (29.1 cases per 100,000 persons) and white patients had such high infection rates raises interesting questions, Shekhawat says, about their community exposure and whether their immune systems uniquely place them at risk.

The shingles vaccination provides strong protection from shingles and its complications, but the vaccine is not widely used. Two doses of Shingrix are more than 90% effective at preventing shingles and are recommended for those age 50 and older.

Even if an adult has had shingles in the past, Shingrix can help prevent future occurrences, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease and Protection.

The Kellogg team of vision and health services researchers included statistician Nidhi Talwar and Joshua D. Stein, M.D., a member of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation and the U-M Center for Eye Policy and Innovation. They studied demographics and variations in herpes zoster ophthalmicus in the United States with support from Eversight Eye Bank and the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation.

The findings were based on health claims data for patients enrolled in a large nationwide managed care plan.


Goodrich Optical Logo


Contact us



Visit us anytime

Goodrich Optical, 2450 Delhi Commerce Dr. Holt, MI 48842


Send us an email

info@goodrichoptical.com



Subscribe


Sign up for our newsletter to receive all the latest eye health news as well as offers and discounts from Goodrich Optical.





    Copyright © 2019 all rights reserved.



    Copyright ©2021 all rights reserved